1. Home

Discuss in my forum

Why Does My Front Load Washer Smell So Bad?

By

Why Does My Front Load Washer Smell So Bad?

Getty Images

Why does my front load washer smell so bad?

You won't like this answer, but it smells bad because of you. And how you do laundry. And where you live.

See, I told you that you wouldn't like the answer.

The History of Front Load Washers

Front-load washers have been around for many, many years. The front-loader as we know it today was introduced by the Bendix Corporation in 1937 at the Louisiana State Fair. This machine was fully automated and would wash, spin and drain with no help from the homemaker. The rubber gasket door-sealing technology made all this possible. These first front-load machines were big, used plenty of water and rocked and rolled so much they had to be bolted to the floor.

Then came World War II and the manufacture of home appliances was put on the back burner as all hands worked on war supplies. After the war in the 1950s, Whirlpool and General Electric developed the twin-tub system of top-loaders with one tub holding an agitator for the cleaning and rinsing operations, and another tub for the spin dry process. This design reduced the costs of automatic washing machines and made them more accessible to the public and top-load washers become the norm in the United States. These were the days when no one worried about water or electricity usage.

As Europeans recovered from the war, they turned to smaller front-load machines that allowed the user to wash and dry in the same machine. Front-load washers are still the most popular design in Europe.

Americans keep using the top-load design until the early 2000s when energy conservation concerns - especially water shortages - brought back the front-load washer to U.S. markets. There washer were smaller, sleek and run by electronic brains.

But Why Does My Front Load Washer Smell Bad?

After nearly six decades of being taught to use a top-load washer, Americans had to learn a new way to wash clothes in a front-loader. We want to use lots of detergent. We want to see lots of suds. We want to add lots of scent and fabric softeners to our laundry.

When products are added with abandon to a washer that uses less water, a large portion of the product does not get fully used or rinsed away. This sludge-like coating of detergent and fabric softener contains some body soil and fibers from clothing. There it is trapped in a warm, moist machine or drainage pipe, just waiting for a mold or mildew spore and bacterium that are floating everywhere in the air to find a home. Find a home, settle in and grow some more smelly little spores and bacteria.

Not only does your washer provide a convenient little incubator for these odors, your laundry room may as well. Is your washer and laundry room well ventilated - and I don't mean the dryer vent? Is your laundry area air-conditioned? More moisture, more heat, more odor.

When companies build a front-load washer, they put it through hundreds of tests. But they conduct these tests day-in-and-day-out for weeks. While it may seem that you do laundry day-in-and-day-out, many times several days lapse between loads giving the odors time to blossom. In that nice clean, air-conditioned laboratory, they don't let things sit around to grow.

That's why your washer smells less than fresh.

My Friend's Washer Smells Fine, But What Can I Do?

There are thousands of people who never have an issue with front-loader odor. These people have found the perfect routine and formula for front-load washing. They follow every direction, they have great ventilation, temperature and humidity in their laundry room and wash clothes very frequently to keep flushing away the problems.

Here's what you can do:

  1. About.com
  2. Home
  3. Laundry & Laundry Rooms
  4. Appliances
  5. Clothes Washers
  6. Washer Maintenance & Repair
  7. Why Does My Front Load Washer Smell So Bad?

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.